South African Hunting Safaris

Zambia
Ivy Safaris has partnered with Mumembe Safaris to offer a wider range of species to add to any African hunt.
Activities
OTHER THAN HUNTING, we offer a wide range of activities and facilities for the whole family!
Packages
Our Packages offer you a choice of not to be missed deals, ideal for a family hunting experience with Ivy Safaris!
Enquiries
To make a booking enquiry with Ivy Safaris, complete our Enquiry Form provided on our website . . . .

Frequently Asked Questions

Ivy Safaris does not accept any responsibility for out-of-date information on this website and relies on you, the client, to double-check the information provided. We will, however, gladly assist you in any way possible to make your trip successful and enjoyable. Send us your questions and requests!!

 What guns, ammo and rifle accessories do I need to bring?

 How much ammo am I allowed to bring?

 What sights and/or optics do you recommend? Accessories?

 What important information do I need to know and what documentation is required?

 What are South Africa's entry regulations?

 Can I hire/rent a firearm from you?

 How many animals can I expect to collect in a 10 day hunt?

 What style of hunting can I expect?

 What kind of physical activity can I expect while hunting with Ivy Safaris?

 Do "High fence" hunting areas really provide 'fair chase' hunting conditions?

 Does Ivy Safaris offer wingshooting?

 How is the accommodation at your lodge?

 You mention 'top class meals'. Really?

 What weather can I expect?

 What clothing and gear should I bring?

 How can I prepare for the best hunt possible?

 What health issues are there for travellers?

 Should I get special trip insurance?

 Which airlines do you recommend to O.R. Tambo Airport (Jo'burg)?

 What about my flight from O.R. Tambo (Joburg) to Polokwane Gateway International?

 What is of local interest in the Polokwane area and Limpopo Province?

 What shall I do with my trophies?

 How do I book with Ivy Safaris?

 What about gratuities?

 How much ammo am I allowed to bring?

 What helpful websites can I visit?

 What guns, ammo and rifle accessories do I need to bring?

We consider 7mm/.284 to be the reliable minimum calibre. Many international hunters like the .270 or the 6.5x55, but some of our larger and tougher game (e.g. wildebeest, zebra, gemsbok, and eland) really do need a .30 calibre and 11.22+g (180+gr) bullets.

Since most shooting distances will be within 150m (165yds), it isn't necessary to bring calibres such as .270 Weatherby and .300 Win Mag. You will rarely be taking (350m) 380yd shots. (To our way of thinking, stalking closer is preferred to long-range gunfire). We have seen far too many avoidable woundings of game from high-velocity, lightweight deer bullets that break up dramatically and do not penetrate reliably to the vitals. Magnums are also not necessary on our ranch or most of our concession areas. Many clients do not shoot as sucessfully with them as with a .308 or .30-06.

While the 7mm's can perform satisfactorily, we prefer the use of .30 (7.62mm) and above for greater bullet mass and sectional density. If you absolutely must bring a 7x57, 7-08, or 7mm Rem Mag, please use heavy, strongly-built bullets to avoid break-up on impact.

A .308 with 11.66/12.96g (180/200gr) will serve for all game except perhaps eland. (We consider 11.66g/180gr the minimum weight in .308). Please use a tough bullet, such as the Nosler Partition, Norma, Swift, or BarnesX. (We recently saw in action some 11.66g/180gr Sierra Game Kings, which broke up far more than the client had expected, and this was not the first time that we had unsatifactory results from the Game Kings).

A .30-06, especially with a 12.96/14.25g(200/200gr) bullet, is a good overall choice (and is the minimum calibre for eland), a .338 is somewhat better, but my choice would be in the .375 class. A .30-06 will penetrate noticeably better than the .308, which may be necessary for that difficult shot on wildebeest or gemsbok.

An 8x57 Mauser and .303 Enfield with proper hunting bullets will perform well. Other good choices are .338-06 and .35 Whelen but ammunition is not always available in South Africa.

The .338 Win Mag is a good round, if you can shoot it reliably (but remember, not too much speed). Nothing larger is required for our plains game, even eland. A downloaded .375 H&H is also a good calibre and easy to shoot.

One of our clients hunted with his Marlin .45/70 (22.68g at 610m/sec) or (350gr at 2000fps), which did well if kept within reasonable distances (less than 90m/100yrds).

Handloaded ammunition is fine, but it is not advisable to try to attain the fastest velocity, which usually is not the most accurate. You also risk sticky extraction or even case head separations. Heaviest or second heaviest bullets fired at 2400-2800fps (±720-840m/s) are optimal.

As far as rifles go, we prefer "Mausers Type Actions" with their controlled feed action, but any quality push feed action will be fine.

It is important to be well-practiced and shoot reliably with your rifle, whatever the make or calibre. "A good man with an average gun will outperform an average man with a great gun". You should be able to group within 6" (150mm) at 100yds (90m) from shooting sticks, and 6" (150mm) at 200yds (180m) from sitting. If you prefer to shoot offhand (not generally recommended), the same grouping is required as above. (Remember to account for "buck fever" in your technique). You should also be very familiar with your round's trajectory at all sporting ranges. Being able to reliably get hits on running game may be necessary as follow-up. (for more info: Jeff Cooper's "Art of the Rifle" www.paladin-press.com is a good work on the subject).

In short, any good .308 or .30-06 with proper bullets is "enough gun." A more powerful rifle isn't necessary and will not make up for the poor shooting it often causes due to flinching. If you must bring a magnum, at least load it with heavy, tough bullets. Bullets for Whitetail Deer or Fallow Deer at 3300fps (±1000m/s) generally don't perform well on African game, in places that shoot over smaller distances.

Another thing to remember when choosing your rifle and scope to bring on your African safari, stay away from shinny chrome type finnishes and stay with good old blued guns or guns that have been gun coated in darker shades. African game can already see you too easily, don't make it even easier.

 How much ammo am I allowed to bring?

The holder of an import permit may not possess more than 200 cartridges for each firearm mentioned on the import permit unless approved by the Central Firearms Control Register. This is a South African Regulation.

Also, you may not generally return to your country with more than 50 rounds.

So, bring about 50 rounds for your main hunting rifle. This will provide you plenty for zeroing (and re-zeroing if your sight malfunctions). Most airlines have a 5kg/11lb ammo weight restriction, but this is not often strictly enforced. Use a proper ammo box, such as the green plastic boxes from MTM-Caseguard.

SUMMARY: GUNS & AMMO

Plains game

Light Calibre Rifle (optional) just for fun!

One of the .20 calibres (.222, .223, .243 etc.) for game such as steenbok, duiker etc., 40 rounds of ammunition

Medium Calibre Rifle

The 6.5x55, a scandinavian calibre is great for most of the thinner skinned animals, like impala, blesbok, red hartebeest etc., but not a good idea if you want to go for Wildebeest etc. It can take them down but it is risky.

One of the .30 calibre rifles or bigger with a sling (.308, .30-06, .338, 9.3x62 [optimal] or 7mm, .300 mag) for all medium plains game such as kudu, zebra etc.,

One medium to heavy rifle (.375 H&H) for bigger plains game such as eland.

50-80 rounds of expanding type, tough ammunition.

Big Game

One heavy rifle (.375, .458, .470, etc) when hunting big game.

30 to 40 rounds expanding type, tough ammunition (FMJ for elephant & rhino).

20 to 30 rounds of full metal jacket ammunition.

Interesting Note: We are primarily hunting in the bushveld areas where the habitat is generally dense. This makes the average shot taken usually under the 150m (160 yard) mark.

Rifle Transport

Locking hard case (Airline approved)

Soft gun case, or sock case for when you are in the bush.

 What sights and/or optics do you recommend? Accessories?

The scope we recommend to our clients are the simple 4x, 1.5-5x, or 2-7x. Remember, our ranch has much brush and trees, and you'll probably be taking most shots within 100yrds (90m). A 3-9x is the most magnification you'll need, and anything more may be detrimental. (An immature bull at 12x looks like a grand old monster)! If hunting with a larger rifle for Big Game, it is preferable to have a scope of 1-5 magnification.

We've seen good shooting from Scout-type rifles using low-powered (2.5x) forward mounted scopes, which works quite well in our terrain.

A functional sling as carrying strap and shooting aid is vital. The Ching Sling found on Steyr Scout rifles is a notable example.

Some of our clients have previously not shot with shooting sticks but, on trying it out, have really enjoyed the added stability as there is not always a suitable, natural dead-rest available. We have bi-pods and tri-pods, so it is not necessary to bring your own.

Do remember to bring good binoculars with a comfortable strap. Smaller pairs are recommended, such as 8x30s or 7x42s. High quality bino's are a real treat, and you'll appreciate their superior clarity.

We usually like to carry a laser rangefinder in the veld, but bring yours if you wish.

 What important information do I need to know and what documentation is required?

You may temporarily import only one firearm per calibre, and no semi- or full-auto rifles are allowed.

This is the procedure when coming from the USA - but the general idea is the same from most European destinations.

A) Get a U.S. Customs Form 4457 "Certificate of Registration for Personal Effects Taken Abroad" for proof of prior-hunt ownership of your guns. This is available at all U.S. International airports, but we recommend doing so days before your flight, as you don't want to risk delay on your departure date. This form has no expiration date, and is valid for unlimited returns home. (Many clients laminate theirs.)

If you are not near an international airport, a letter from your local LEO will suffice.

(Even a notarised letter of ownership will probably satisfy U.S. Customs.)

B) Take good digital pictures of your hunting firearms, and keep them with you on CD or USB drive in case they are lost in transit.

C) Record the serial numbers (don't forget the scope), and keep the paper with you.

D) Use a very sturdy rifle case such as Pelican or Tuffpak. Wide orange or yellow tape with your name/flights in black marker will distinguish your case from all others. Have digital photos of your case on hand so that you may quickly identify it if lost or delayed.

TSA firearm traveling:

The key regulatory requirements to transporting firearms, firearm parts or ammunition in checked baggage are:

  • You must declare all firearms to the airline during the ticket counter check-in process
  • The firearm must be unloaded
  • The firearm must be in a hard-sided container
  • The container must be locked
  • We recommend that you provide the key or combination to the security officer if he or she needs to open the container. You should remain present during screening to take the key back after the container is cleared. If you are not present and the security officer must open the container, the airline will make a reasonable attempt to contact you. If they can't contact you, the container will not be placed on the plane. Federal regulations prohibit unlocked gun cases (or cases with broken locks) on aircraft
  • You must securely pack any ammunition in fiber (such as cardboard), wood or metal boxes or other packaging that is specifically designed to carry small amounts of ammunition
  • You can't use firearm magazines/clips for packing ammunition unless they completely and securely enclose the ammunition (e.g., by securely covering the exposed portions of the magazine or by securely placing the magazine in a pouch, holder, holster or lanyard)
  • You may carry the ammunition in the same hard-sided case as the firearm, as long as you pack it as described above
  • You can't bring black powder or percussion caps used with black-powder type firearms in either your carry-on or checked baggage.

http://www.tsa.gov/traveller-information

E) The South African gun permit is free if you apply upon arrival in O.R. Tambo Int. (Johannesburg), but we do NOT recommend waiting until then to fill it out as the delay can be from 3-8 hours. Another solution is to pay approx. US$110 (this may change from time to time) for PHASA (Professional Hunters Association of South Africa) to handle this weeks in advance for you. Thus, your permit will be waiting for you, and you'll be the envy of those unfortunate hunters hanging about in the lobby--wishing they'd spent the money. The choice is yours.

http://www.professionalhunters.co.za

The SAPS 520 form is quite detailed, so please fill it in very carefully.

It is downloadable from:

http://www.saps.gov.za/crime_prevention/firearms/forms/english/e520.pdf

...and these links offer instructions on completing the form.

http://www.saps.gov.za/crime_prevention/firearms/import_info.htm

PHASA must receive your form and fee (payable by credit card) no less than three weeks before your arrival. While U.S. Global Mail promises delivery in 5-7 days, it's been known to take weeks. (For more reliable service, FedEx, etc. is preferred.) Do email PHASA and inquire if they've received your form in time for processing.

Also, please instruct us (Ivy Safaris) to send PHASA an original letter of hunting invitation, which is required to process your permit. (Hunting occurs on the Farm Smitskraal LS788 60km (40 miles) north of Polokwane in the Limpopo Province)

F) Upon arrival at O.R. Tambo (Johannesburg) International Airport:

  1. Go through passport control
  2. Collect your checked luggage at the baggage claim. Do not wait for your gun case to arrive on the same conveyor belt as your other checked luggage. It's collected by airport personnel, and will be waiting at the police kiosk in front of baggage claim #1. (NOTE: If travelling with partners, have one collect the checked luggage, and the others to oversee the rifle cases)
  3. Next to Import/Export Office is a black cage marked Firearms and Security Items managed by Securecor. Go there to identify your rifle case and sign for it. Please make sure that your rifle case has your name on it. (Your rifle case will be delivered to the SAP office. You neither have to pay nor tip for this service, even if asked)
  4. Proceed on the GREEN line through customs
  5. In the arrival hall, look for ABSA Bank. Look for the sign for SAP Firearms Office, located near escalator between ABSA bank and Post Office. Go to the SAP office. You will be met there by one PHASA's staff with your permit. The police officers will check the serial numbers on your permit with the serial numbers on your rifles. (Please note that the speed with which your permit will be handled is dependant upon the speed with which the rifle case is handled behind the scenes. Sometimes it takes a bit of time to get the rifle case to the police office. PHASA has no control over that. Please be patient when waiting for your rifle case, and make sure that your rifle case has your name on it) IN CASE OF A CONNECTING FLIGHT
  6. You can now continue on your connecting flight. From there, proceed for about 500metres to the domestic departures terminal. Luggage carts are free to use. SAA Airlink check-in is at certain desks, usually in the bank of counters closer to the security area. Once you have your Polokwane (or other destination) ticket and baggage stubs, take your rifle case to the SAP office which is left of the security check-in, near the restrooms. They will have it loaded on your flight for you.

G) While on Ivy Safari's ranch, you won't need to keep the gun permit on your person, but you must do so when travelling off the ranch. Police checkpoints are random events, but you'll have no trouble if your permit is on hand.

 What are South Africa's entry regulations?

All visitors require a passport, valid for no less than 30 days (we generally recommend 6 months so as to avoid any unecessary problems) after the expiry of the intended visit. Travellers must ensure passports contain at least one (we recommend at least 2) unused (blank) page.

http://www.professionalhunters.co.za/index.php?pid=4

  • Passport
  • Travel documents, air tickets etc.
  • Visa - when required (not required for US, Canadian and most Euro zone Citizens in RSA )
  • Reading material
  • Phone numbers and contact details for Ivy Safaris
  • Confirmation numbers for cars, hotels, etc.
  • Money (some cash, travelers checks)
  • Medical records (as required)
  • Travel Insurance
  • U.S. Customs form registering your weapons in the U.S.

Very Important

All documentation required to temporarily import your gun into South Africa (invitation, police form etc.)

See PHASA website for details:- www.phasa.co.za

Or e-mail Phasa:- admin@phasa.co.za

If all the above documents etc. are in order there should be no problems at all.

 Can I hire/rent a firearm from you?

Yes, you can hire/rent a firearm from us. We have a few to choose from, .223Rem., (small game) 2 x .308Win., .30-06Spring., (medium game) .375H&H (large game) and 4 x 12Ga. O/U shotguns (wingshooting).

Sometimes if your trip is not all that long and you are planning to tour afterwards or just that you do not want the hassle of airport transits etc. Renting is a great alternative option.

 How many animals can I expect to collect in a 10 day hunt?

A fit and accurate hunter can reasonably expect 5-6 good quality trophies. We are well stocked and we generally know our herds. The hunting is fun and challenging, but not brutal and frustrating. An average goal of an animal every other day is realistic, and generally attained. This really depends on many factors, but we like to hunt hard aand get what is needed. But, hunting is hunting!!

 What style of hunting can I expect?

We are very keen on a "walk and stalk" style of hunting as this will expose you to Africa in its wildest form. Fair chase is the name of the game. We are a hunting safari operator and not a shooting farm!

 What kind of physical activity can I expect while hunting with Ivy Safaris?

Since we never "diesel stalk" or shoot from the 4X4, be prepared to walk as much as 4 hours in the morning (7-11AM) and again in the afternoon (2-6PM). Terrain is generally flat, unless we are climbing one of our rock dome "kopjes."

Often, to close the distance for an optimal shot, we must "leopard crawl" through the grass. This greatly adds to the hunting experience, if you're fit enough. The Marine Corps digital camo's have knee/elbow pockets for thin neoprene padding, which really helps for a comfortable crawl.

If you are unable or unwilling to "leopard crawl" we are rather imaginative in getting you to the animal in other ways.

 Do "High fence" hunting areas really provide 'fair chase' hunting conditions?

For the game we offer, absolutely. Remember, that the areas we're hunting on are usually a minimum of 10 square miles (25 square kilometres), roughly 3 miles (±5km) per side. You'll rarely bump against a "High fence" and the game has plenty of area and a wide variety of cover in which to escape. We also hunt on many other consessions so there is a variety of terrain.

 Does Ivy Safaris offer wingshooting?

Indeed, and it's quite good! Guineafowl and Francolin (Partridge) are most common and we have very good working dogs (all named after guns: Remington, Marlin, Ruger, Browning, Beretta etc.). It is preferable to bring a 12 gauge shotgun as ammo is easier to come by than the others. Shotgun shells can be purchased from us at a reasonable price vs. bringing in such heavy ammo. For Francolin, Duck and Guineafowl we use 5, 6 & 7 shot @ 11/8 Oz (32gr) or 11/4 Oz (35gr)

So, do bring your sporting shotgun to enjoy afternoons of very pleasant wingshooting. It's an excellent way to end the day and adds to your dinner variety!

"We do also have shotguns for hire @US$30/day"! - South African Price. Please note that shotgun hire in other countries can be very different.

 How is the accommodation at your lodge?

Ample, simple, and quite comfortable - as in any decent B&B or Motel. We have a 220V AC so if you need to charge any American appliance during your stay, please make sure that your gadget has an AC rating from 100V to 240V. Most modern electronics will have this wide range. As far as electrical appliances from Europe are concerned, we in South Africa have our own electrical sockets, but we also use the standard European style electrical sockets.

 You mention 'top class meals'. Really?

Just ask our previous clients! Lisa is a superb cook, and our game is deliciously prepared. Whatever you hunt, we will transform into some of the best meals you've ever enjoyed. Let us know in advance your food preferences and biases, and we will seek to accommodate them.

South African beer and wines are good, and are included in your daily rate.

 What weather can I expect?

The weather and temperatures can vary considerably in Southern Africa. Depending on the season temperatures can range from 0oC (32oF) in winter up to 38oC (100oF) in the summer months. Summer is from October to March and the temperatures can on occasion go over the 38oC (100oF) mark. Winters have been known to dip under the OoC (32oF).

SA Weather Service:

http://www.saweather.co.za/

 What clothing and gear should I bring?

Good, sturdy, cotton camo or darker earth tone clothing is best. (Tan and khaki are really too bright.) Buttons are preferred over noisy velcro and zippers.

As far as camo goes (camo is permitted in South Africa, but not in many of the other African countries), the new U.S. Marine digital (green or desert) is just amazing. (The U.S. Army digital is not nearly as effective, having too much grey, which stands out.) Our terrain reminds clients of high-desert Arizona plateau, so the classic woodland camo has more green than is effective.

Bring sturdy, (light-weight) and well broken-in hiking boots. (If you've room, a spare pair might come in handy in case you lose a heel) as well as a pair of comfortable shoes or sandals to wear around camp. Medium weight wool socks work well. Also, don't forget a brimmed hat.

The Camelbak hydration system is very handy, and well-proven in the field. The 3 letres (100oz) Mule version is a small backpack, but not too large for daily hunting.

A windproof jacket or a warm sweater is essential as the nights can be cold. Rain, during the winter months April to September is rare, but rather bring a rain suit just in case.

We have a good laundry service at our lodge, so two or three (at most) sets of hunting clothes will be sufficient.

SUMMARY LIST

  • 1 jacket/coat
  • 3 Pairs of cotton trousers
  • 3 Shirts cotton, long or short sleeve
  • 5 Undershirts (optional) and under shorts.
  • 5 Pairs of socks
  • 1 pair of sock savers (optional)
  • 1 hat or cap (remember it must not be a light colour)
  • 1 Belt
  • 1 Pair of soft soled shoes/boots (please not large boots as these are loud and make stalking impossible)
  • 1 Pair of comfortable shoes or sandals
  • 1 Down or wool sweater.
  • 1 Jogging suit or PJ's for sleeping
  • 1 Light pair of gloves. (Mornings and evenings can be cold)

Miscellaneous Extras

  • Chapstick (Lip-balm)
  • Folding knife
  • Belt style cartridge holder
  • Suntan lotion, Insect repellent and skin moisturisers
  • Sunglasses
  • Extra pair of prescription glasses
  • Small binoculars
  • Camera with extra batteries
  • Extra cards for digital cameras or extra film
  • Video camera (optional) take extra batteries or charger
  • Small international voltage converter (can come in handy)
  • Washcloths
  • Medications and recommended shots (contact your doctor)
  • Personal toiletries kit - razor, comb etc
  • Candy/sweets (optional! But, advisable if you have a sweet tooth)
  • Flashlight with spare batteries
  • Plastic bags - Zip lock type

 How can I prepare for the best hunt possible?

Become fit, very practiced with your rifle and study the game's habits and anatomy. Many shots will be quartering angles, and prior knowledge of optimal best shot placement is important. We will go over this in person once you're here.

Dry-firing at game photos is fine preparation, and will acquaint your shooting eye.

"The Perfect Shot" is a great book to study in advance.

 What health issues are there for travellers?

Visitors are advised to take pre-arrival precautions against malaria, especially in the northern parts of the country, hepatitis A, polio and typhoid.

Health Information for Travelers to Countries in Southern Africa

http://www.cdc.gov/travel/safrica.htm

Malaria Information for Travelers to Countries in Southern Africa

http://www.cdc.gov/travel/regionalmalaria/safrica.htm

Our main lodge is in an extremely low risk area for malaria, but if we do any touring, i.e. to the Kruger National Park we will be visiting higher risk areas.

 Should I get special trip insurance?

This is probably a good idea to protect yourself against trip cancellation, baggage loss/delay, and emergency medical issues.

For our clients from the USA and Canada we recommend Gracy Travel Intl. they are quite familiar with safari needs: http://www.gracytravel.com

 Which airlines do you recommend to O.R. Tambo Airport (Jo'burg)?

From Europe:

When flying from Europe there are many more options to choose from and if one flies with the country's national carrier one would find all relevant information and regulations from that company.

Flying via Heathrow in London with a firearm can lead to problems and hassels. The airport rules make easy transfer problematic. A better choice is Frankfurt, Zurich and Paris.

From USA:

South African Airways (very nice Airbus 340s) and Lufthansa (mostly A380's and 747-400's) from Frankfurt offer fine service in Star Alliance conjunction. There are many direct flights to Frankfurt from the USA, such as from Denver, Phoenix, Dallas, Houston, etc.

KLM from Amsterdam is also quite good. You must get a transit permit in advance for your guns: http://www.gracytravel.com/south-africa-gun-permit

SwissAir through Zurich offers very good service.

British Airways are fussy about firearms, as is the UK. Not a top choice. Also, UK flights allow very little carry-on luggage and no electronic devices.

Air France? Generally not used.

Gracy Travel Intl. is very experienced at booking safari travel:

http://gracytravel.com

If you're flying with your guns, call the airline and ask them how they want them secured for the flight. These regulations may differ with different airlines. Our suggestion is that when you call the airline you are traveling with, document the time, date and to whom you spoke and take that with you to the check-in counter.

The ban on liquids and gels for U.S. flights may still be in effect as you read this, but check www.tsa.gov to confirm.

 What about my flight from O.R. Tambo (Joburg) to Polokwane Gateway International?

This is a 50 minute/320km (200 mile) trip by turboprop for about US$300 (changes with exchange rate fluctuations). This extra flight can also be bought with your main ticket and will usually work out cheaper this way.

The IATA code for Polokwane/Pietersburg is PTG.

SA Airlink provides daily service:

http://www.flyairlink.com

Please allow at least a three hour layover between your Jo'burg and connecting flights to give you sufficient time to collect your bags, get your gun permit, change terminals, etc.

Before boarding your Polokwane flight on the tarmac, please confirm that your checked baggage is indeed on the manifest.

O.R. Tambo (Johannesburg) Airport tips:

You will be frequently accosted by willing porters. (The officially sanctioned ones wear orange jumpsuits.) If you know where you are going and do not require any portage, politely refuse their offer and keep walking. If you ask them any questions, they will naturally expect a tip. Keep a confident, but sternly polite, demeanor and they will move on to the next prospective customer.

In the domestic terminal, once you clear security there are no money exchange offices. If you need some pocket Rands for airport spending, remember to change money before the security check-in.

There are various places to sit down and eat if you have a long delay between flights. Many take-away places are also scattered through out the airport.

 What is of local interest in the Polokwane area and Limpopo Province?

If you've ever seen the film "Breaker Morant", then you'll be keen to learn that such Transvaal events took place nearby. A local eatery, Lalapanzi, has a small museum dedicated to the Bushveld Carbineers and the Boer counter-insurgents, showcasing many interesting artifacts (such as a stirrup of Cecil Rhodes).

Limpopo Province has half of the Kruger National Park within its boundaries and we are 2 hours drive from the world-renowned conservation area.

Mapungubwe National Park is a 3 hour drive from us and you go through the Soutpansberg Mountains (awesome scenery) and see some amazing sites of Baobab trees and general wild beauty. The park it self has from nice comfortable accommodation to more rustic camping sites.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limpopo_Province

 What shall I do with my trophies?

There are basically three options:

1) You can have your trophies mounted and tanned here in South Africa. We have many talented taxidermists avaliable to choose from, here are 2 suggestions:

www.capricorntaxidermy.com

http://karootaxidermy.com

2) Arrange with a taxidermist to basically handle the whole process from A-Z. We suggest First Class Trophy, they mainly serve Europe, but are branching out to include other parts of the world:

http://firstclasstrophy.com/

3) We can arrange for a taxidermist here to dip/pack/crate and certify your trophies here for International shipment to a taxidermist of your choice in your home country.

 How do I book with Ivy Safaris?

Fill in the Enquiries page on this website, then Ivy Safaris will send you a quote for your safari. Once you have accepted the quote, we will send you an invoice with banking details on it. At this time we will also inter into a Contract, so that you know exactly what to expect.

Receipt of 50% of the total daily rate will formally book your safari. The balance is payable 8 weeks prior to arrival in South Africa and please do remember to inform your bank to cover all transfer costs on your side and ours.

Game and any extras can be paid by travelers cheques and/or cash, and we can communicate a suggested exchange rate to bring. beforehand.

 What about gratuities?

We've an excellent staff to serve you, and gratuities are most appreciated. We can discuss suggested amounts once you're here, but a rule of thumb to consider meanwhile is between US$50-US$100/hunting day (which covers the entire staff). Cash is easiest for this, payable at hunt's end to Mark or Lisa, who will disburse to the individuals on your behalf to ensure that "backroom" staff also get their share.

 How much ammo am I allowed to bring?

The holder of an import permit may not possess more than 200 cartridges for each firearm mentioned on the import permit unless approved by the Central Firearms Control Register. This is a South African Regulation.

Also, you may not generally return to your country with more than 50 rounds.

So, bring about 50 rounds for your main hunting rifle. This will provide you plenty for zeroing (and re-zeroing if your sight malfunctions). Most airlines have a 5kg/11lb ammo weight restriction, but this is not often strictly enforced. Use a proper ammo box, such as the green plastic boxes from MTM-Caseguard.

SUMMARY: GUNS & AMMO

Plains game

Light Calibre Rifle (optional) just for fun!

One of the .20 calibres (.222, .223, .243 etc.) for game such as steenbok, duiker etc., 40 rounds of ammunition

Medium Calibre Rifle

The 6.5x55, a scandinavian calibre is great for most of the thinner skinned animals, like impala, blesbok, red hartebeest etc., but not a good idea if you want to go for Wildebeest etc. It can take them down but it is risky.

One of the .30 calibre rifles or bigger with a sling (.308, .30-06, .338, 9.3x62 [optimal] or 7mm, .300 mag) for all medium plains game such as kudu, zebra etc.,

One medium to heavy rifle (.375 H&H) for bigger plains game such as eland.

50-80 rounds of expanding type, tough ammunition.

Big Game

One heavy rifle (.375, .458, .470, etc) when hunting big game.

30 to 40 rounds expanding type, tough ammunition (FMJ for elephant & rhino).

20 to 30 rounds of full metal jacket ammunition.

Interesting Note: We are primarily hunting in the bushveld areas where the habitat is generally dense. This makes the average shot taken usually under the 150m (160 yard) mark.

Rifle Transport

Locking hard case (Airline approved)

Soft gun case, or sock case for when you are in the bush.

 What helpful websites can I visit?

Hunting as a form of tourism contributes enormously to the economy of South Africa. Some 70,000 jobs have been created on game ranches and directly from professional hunting. The game populations have exploded since game ranching has become popular.

http://www.professionalhunters.co.za/index.php?pid=3

Gracy Travel Intl.

http://gracytravel.com/index.htm

South African Rand exchange rates:

http://www.x-rates.com/d/ZAR/table.html